Tips to Distinguish Flood-Damaged Cars

used cars for sale mnMore often than not, dealers don’t state in a vehicle’s history report that the car had experienced nicks and ticks during past floods. This is usually due to lack of an all-in insurance coverage leading to the lack of authorization to file a claim. That is why picking out the best insurance deal before buying a vehicle is extremely crucial. Here are tips on what to check to avoid such used cars for sale in MN.

Peculiar Aromas

Take note if the air freshener used once you open the car makes you want to wrinkle your nose due to its strong scent. This is to cover up the mildew odors that the car would have given off after having been soaked in the water for a few hours. If the vehicle is too heavily masked by air freshener, you can switch the air conditioner on and check that musty aroma that may come from the air vents. Also, inspecting narrow spaces where it is challenging to clean might lead you to discover moldy buildup.

Suspicious Upholstery

Like the air freshener, sellers may try to hide faded, discolored or stained seat covers and carpets due to water damage by renewing the upholstery, making it look convincingly clean as if newly bought. It’s essential always to be cautious of the tiniest details. A second-hand car looking brand-new can bring in strong suspicions.

Water Buildup Hints

Noticeable signs of water buildup all over the vehicle, such as:

  • Fogged headlamps and tail lights.
  • There are muddy and moist areas due to pooling of water, e.g., wheel well overhangs.
  • Marked water line in the glove compartment, engine chamber, or the trunk is observable. This suggests that the car was once in stagnant water for a significant amount of time.

Undercarriage Checkups

Undoubtedly, finding rust and flaking in the undercarriage is a primary indicator of a flood-damaged car. These signs cannot be detected on any other vehicles.

Earth and Mud Where There Shouldn’t Be

Questionable signs of nit and grit inside the car such as below or inside the glove compartment, sections surrounding the seat tracks, or under the carpeting. While these are only areas you can see, a trained mechanic can inspect deeper nooks and crannies for a more thorough check-up. These include wiring harnesses, starter motors, and power relays.

Selling damaged vehicles as new or without damage is an act of fraud and is therefore punishable according to the law. If you have strong skepticism about a particular car dealer, calling law enforcement or an automobile insurance company is recommended.